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Criminology Activities for Schools and Colleges


On-campus events/activities


Date: Coming soon

Location: Pontypridd campus - Treforest

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

With talks from key note speakers and a variety of workshops, students will be introduced to the world of Criminology and Criminal Justice. During sessions, students will explore why people commit crimes, and how we should respond to criminal activity. Students will have the opportunity to learn about a wide range of topics, from drug misuse to terrorism, prisons and the role of the police. Students will also discover how major crimes are investigated. Sessions will be aligned to the A-Level syllabus. 

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Activities at your school/college


Date: on request

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

This session will examine the growing social problem of ‘Knife Crime’ and how this epidemic is being responded to by the Government, police and society. In the session students will start by looking at the data – how many attacks have taken place? What is the knife-related homicides rate? Who is affected? What does the statistics tell us about victims and perpetrators? 

Students will then examine the social context of knife-related homicide – has the Government’s austerity measures caused many of the problems that we are seeing today? Can we consider the intensifying austerity rolled out since 2010 as a factor that has conditioned the problem of knife crime? The session will look at these questions and how Criminologists have been looking at the epidemic of knife crime in recent years. 

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Date: on request

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

The main focus of contemporary criminological theory is to provide answers to the question: Why do some people get involved in criminal and deviant activities? Criminological theorists have attempted to answer this question mainly from biological, psychological, and sociological points of view.  This taster session focuses on a selected sociological theory of crime that is known as ‘General Strain Theory’.  Drawing upon real case studies, the session will examine the extent to which the General Strain Theory could explain ‘terrorist’ acts.

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Date: on request

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

The youth justice system deals with those young people between the ages of 10 and 17 who commit a criminal offence. This taster session considers why some young people might get in trouble with the law and how society reacts to such behaviour. Using case studies and an interactive approach, it asks questions such as: ‘what happens to young people who offend?’ and ‘what might be the best way to deal with youth crime?’

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Date: on request

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

Tackle tough questions on how we should punish crime, whether prison even works and how those that are in custody 'experience' it differently. Working in groups, suggest alternatives to the prison system.

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Date: on request

Suitable for year 12 and 13 and equivalent students

When we think of ‘policing’ we might think of uniformed officers, employed by the state, aiming to reduce crime by making arrests. However, this is a relatively old-fashioned image of the police. Modern policing encompasses a wide range of activities, undertaken by various actors and institutions. During this session, we will think about alternative, sometimes hidden, methods of policing, and the consequences that these have on our society.

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