Outreach


Accounting and Finance

Accounting and Finance

Why every entrepreneur needs an accountant: defence in the Dragon’s Den

An entrepreneur may have great ideas, but without an understanding of the figures they will soon flounder and come under attack from the Dragons, as often seen on the popular BBC show. This session will explore the key principles of profitability, cash and budgeting, and demystify the language of the accountant. Using fictional scenarios, students will learn to spot good and bad businesses and know what is required for good financial health.


How much is my Glastonbury ticket?

Modern accounting and finance professionals work at the heart of all organisations, helping to make key decisions to drive them forward. We will highlight the exciting and varied careers available, the skillset required and the decisions accountants help to make, including product pricing, investment, tax advice and the accuracy of profit figures.


Thinking of a Career in Accountancy? Here's what you need to know!

Accountants are typically well rewarded, highly respected and trusted people, whatever industry and organization type they work in whilst many go on to be leaders in the business world because of their accounting background.

This session covers an overview of the field and what a career look like. We also outline our multi accredited accounting and finance degrees and the varying routes to qualifying as an accountant at the University of South Wales.


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Art & Design

Art

Advertising Design

Students will be given an overview of the subject and then get the chance to develop a storyboard for a television advertisement in a fun and interactive workshop. 


Graphics

Students will learn more about our BA (Hons) Graphic Communication course, and why it's a great time to be a graphic designer. Students will see examples of creative design work by current students, and will consider the importance of graphic design in the modern world.


Illustration

Students will learn key elements of visual communication, personal illustrative style and the importance of collaboration, and create individual illustrations that will work together to form a collaborative mandala.


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Biology 

Biology

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus


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Business

Making Business Happen

Making sense of business models

The session will explore how business models introduced within courses such as the Welsh Bac. and Business Studies can be applied using current examples from industry.  Being able to apply models demonstrates understanding and the underlying critical thinking that is needed to achieve success in the qualifications. 


Consumers in Society

How do we understand the way that products and services meet demand?  This session explores the forces that shape changes in society and how consumers are an important part of such transformation.  Making sense of these complex ideas demonstrates the underlying critical thinking that is needed to succeed at Year 12 & 13. 


Creative thinking, thinking creatively

Top tips for maximising your creativity through a series of problem solving tasks that highlight why creativity is so valuable.  As well as being a fundamental skill for success in Year 12 & 13, creativity is essential to the critical thinking that is highlighted by employers as a core soft skill.


Understanding future trends; Using PESTLE to explore electric cars

Changing environments are an essential part of the business landscape and the best companies are able to see the trends and use them to their advantage.  This session will use the developing Electric car sector to explore how environmental analysis can be a valuable activity.  Being able to apply the model demonstrates understanding and the underlying critical thinking that is needed to achieve success in the Welsh Bac. or Business Studies A level. 


Can we really be ethical consumers

Does the increasing awareness for ethical business practice fully recognise the complexity of providing products and services?  This session explores and discusses how views of ethical consumption involve multiple practice and varied perspectives.  Being able to work with these contradictory ideas demonstrates the underlying critical thinking that is needed to succeed at Year 12 & 13. 


How to deal with customer complaints

This session deals with the sensitivities of handling customer complaints effectively. Students will learn about a number of strategies with the help of real examples and case studies. 

BTEC L3 Travel and Tourism, Unit 5: Researching current issues in travel and tourism, Learning Aim A


Sustainability in Travel and Tourism

Why should the travel industry concern itself with social issues? This session will explore how businesses could be responsible, and yet profitable. 

BTEC L3 Travel and Tourism, Unit 5: Researching current issues in travel and tourism, Learning Aim A


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Chemistry

Applied Sciences

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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Childcare and Education

Education

School-based youth work

A scenario based session involving role play, students are challenged to manage teenage referrals for disruptive behaviour and disengagement with the curriculum. Students develop empathy for teachers and advisers whilst working collectively to prepare successful interventions.


Community-based youth work

A scenario based session involving role play, students must develop an approach to engage young people (aged 16 to 19) who have annoyed local residents, and prepare a range of possible resolutions.




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Criminology

Criminology header

Criminological Theory

The main focus of contemporary criminological theory is to provide answers to the question: Why do some people get involved in criminal and deviant activities? Criminological theorists have attempted to answer this question mainly from biological, psychological, and sociological points of view.  This taster session focuses on a selected sociological theory of crime that is known as ‘General Strain Theory’.  Drawing upon real case studies, the session will examine the extent to which the General Strain Theory could explain ‘terrorist’ acts.


Corporate Homicide

Deaths from corporate crime and negligence dwarf most other categories of homicide.  Why then, do we ignore it so much?  In this taster session we will discuss and debate what corporate homicide is, how we can explain it and what might help to prevent it.  Drawing upon real life case studies we will consider diverse crimes including those against consumers (such as food contamination, unsafe pharmaceuticals and aircraft crashes), environmental crimes (such as air pollution) and we will end by considering the recent Grenfell Tower fire that killed at least 80 people. 


Youth Justice

The youth justice system deals with those young people between the ages of 10 and 17 who commit a criminal offence. This taster session considers why some young people might get in trouble with the law and how society reacts to such behaviour. Using case studies and an interactive approach, it asks questions such as: ‘what happens to young people who offend?’ and ‘what might be the best way to deal with youth crime?’


Penology

Tackle tough questions on how we should punish crime, whether prison even works and how those that are in custody 'experience' it differently. Working in groups, suggest alternatives to the prison system.


Policing

When we think of ‘policing’ we might think of uniformed officers, employed by the state, aiming to reduce crime by making arrests. However, this is a relatively old-fashioned image of the police. Modern policing encompasses a wide range of activities, undertaken by various actors and institutions. During this session, we will think about alternative, sometimes hidden, methods of policing, and the consequences that these have on our society.


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Design

Design Subject

Advertising Design

Students will produce a storyboard for a 30-second TV commercial for a brand of their choice. They will also learn more about our BA (Hons) Advertising Design course, the live industry projects students undertake on a local and national level, and the importance of social media in the fast paced world of advertising.


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Drama

Drama-performance

Theatre, Drama and Performing Arts workshops

Drama and Performing Arts staff are available to run practical workshops with students in the following areas:

·         Line reading and improvised work around a script

·         Working physically in a non-naturalistic way

·         Devising processes


Text workshop

Drama and Performing Arts staff will work with students to improve their understanding of course texts, such as; Uncle Vanya and A View From the Bridge.


Gweithdy trafod testun

Mae’r dramodydd ac arweinydd ein cwrs BA (Anrh) Theatr a Drama, Sera Moore Williams, ar gael i drafod ei dramâu Mwnci ar Dân a/neu Crash, o safbwynt cefndir y testun, y cymeriadau, y cynllun a'r llwyfannu.


Gweithdy ymarferol

Mae staff Theatr a Drama ar gael i redeg sesiwn ymarferol ar rai o gyfarwyddwyr arloesol yr ugeinfed ganrif a/neu seminar ar ddadansoddi cynhyrchiad.


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Engineering

Engineering

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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English

English

Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s plays have had, and continue to have, a unique place in English literature and British culture. Their power to entertain, challenge and provoke readers and audiences remains unrivalled. Students will discover more about critical approaches to the best-known and most highly-regarded of the tragedies.


Jane Eyre, history and the Gothic (Unit 1)

Written at a time of revolutions across Europe, Jane Eyre was also considered revolutionary for what it said about women and gender. This session will introduce the cultural and contextual influences within which Charlotte Brontë was writing and look at how she uses Gothic language and conventions (such as the supernatural)  in the novel.


Jane Austen: Love and Money (Unit 1)

Two hundred years after her death, Jane Austen has just been chosen to feature on the new £10 note. Why does she have such popular appeal? And is what she says about love and money still relevant today? This session will look at the attitudes and values expressed in her texts and examine how she uses irony to offer social critique. It will focus on Sense and Sensibility but a similar session may be available on another of Austen’s novels on request.


Reading Christina Rossetti: hidden meanings (Unit 3)

Is ‘Goblin Market’ just a children’s poem? Or can we read it as a poem about religion, addiction, sexuality or even capitalism?  This session will look at some of the possible interpretations of Rossetti’s work and discuss how these relate to the cultural contexts within which she was writing. It will include a focus on close reading techniques in order to examine how Rossetti adapts structure, form and language for effect in her poetry.


Making Connections: Unseen Poetry (Unit 3)

How do poems relate to one another? How are meaning and form shaped by poets? This session will help students develop their confidence in analysing poetry and making connections across works by different poets.  It will introduce literary concepts and terminology and consider how best to organise a comparative analysis of two poems.


Reading/Writing Wales in English

What does it mean to write in English about Wales? How are writers from and in Wales influenced by the cultural and historical contexts within which they write? This is a growing area in literary studies but many people are still unaware of the body of critical work now available. This session provides a general introduction to the study of Welsh writing in English and the range of literary concepts and interpretations which can be used in reading both poetry and prose. It may be tailored to focus on specific writers (Units 2 and 5) on request. 


Creative Writing and Genre (Unit 2 & 4) 

Does Science Fiction have to be set in space? What's the difference between a kiss in a Romance and a kiss in Erotica? And just how do we scare people with words when we write Horror? In this session we'll discuss the role of genre in literary texts, and why writers need to control language, style, and form, in addition to content, when writing in a specific genre. It will include examples from a broad range of texts by contemporary writers. 


Language and Gender (A2 Unit 5: Section 2)

What is the distinction between the term sex and gender? Does ‘women’s language’ exist? Do women speak differently from men, and if so how, why and in what contexts? Are women more polite than men? What message does the language used by women convey about their status in the community? These are the questions examined in this session as well as how we communicate gender in conversation, differences between rapport talk and report talk, the issues of cooperation versus competitiveness in talk, and media representation of gender.


Accents and Dialects (Language and Diversity, A2 Unit 5: Section 4)

Is it what you say, or how you say it that counts? Why is it that when people speak on formal occasions, they tend to approximate to a more prestigious variety of English instead of sticking to their vernacular? Is the class system dead, or is it alive and kicking? This session explores how we use language (accents and dialects) to signal our membership of particular social groups and construct different aspects of our social identity by means of a short talk and workshop.


Non-native Englishes (WAPE)  (Language and Diversity, A2 Unit 5: Section 4)


Different varieties of English have developed since the 19th century. In many communities where multilingualism is the norm, relatively standard varieties of English have co-existed alongside more ‘nativised’ varieties influenced by local languages. One of these new ‘Englishes’ is the West African Pidgin English (WAPE). What is the origin of this variety? How does it convey non-English culture and world view using a simplified form of English? The session examines the origin, development, structure and creativity in WAPE. 


TESOL Workshop: For all Units

Workshop: Lexis, Grammar and the Phonemic Alphabet:  An action-packed, all-in-one, linguistic workshop on the nuts and bolts of English

TESOL Workshop : Unit 5 (Language and self-representation)

Workshop: Colloquialisms, formality, slang and register: How what we say reveals who we are.

TESOL Workshop: Unit 5 (Language Diversity)

Workshop: English…or Englishes? A look at how English is used across the globe and how it has become the “World’s language”.


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Film Studies

Film Producing

Busting Myths?: Women in Comedy (with Dr Lesley Harbidge, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies)

The recent reboot of Ghostbusters divided audiences: ‘a missed opportunity for feminism' or 'some badass, funny women being badass and funny on the screen’? Since the days of silent clowns like Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, comedy, and physical comedy in particular, has routinely been seen as the realm of men. Yet women are increasingly in comedy, both in front of and behind the camera. This session examines comedy as perhaps one of the most challenging, but potentially most liberating, genres for women in film and television.


Rethinking the Space(s) of Cinema (with Dr Lesley Harbidge, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies)

Though domestic viewing practices, and, particularly, the popularity of streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, might be threatening cinema audiences, films are increasingly being enjoyed, and discussed, in a variety of different contexts and unusual locations (from beanbag cinemas to outdoor screenings), whilst cinemas themselves are responding with alternative content (including live-streamed opera) and new technologies (such as 4D). This session examines the changing spaces of film reception and the fresh opportunities for film education this brings, and urges students to reflect on their own viewing practices.


Film and National Identity (with Mr Daryl Perrins, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies)

This workshop will take the topic of the Brexit vote of 2016 as its starting point to discuss how versions of Britishness and/or Welshness are constructed/disseminated through cinema. Central to this debate will be the modes of heritage cinema and social realism. Students will be encouraged to reflect on films such as The King’s Speech (2010), The Viceroy’s House (2017), This is England (2006), Pride (2015) and Patagonia (2010).


The Birth of Cinema (with Mr Daryl Perrins, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies)

This workshop will look at how cinema developed from a technical sideshow to an art form which gradually moved from spectacle to narrative, preceding Hollywood. In particular it will stress the role of the early pioneers in developing a cinema of realism (via the actualities of the Lumière Brothers) and, counter to this, a cinema of non-realism or fantasy (Georges Méliès), tropes and divisions that are still very much in evidence today. Students will be encouraged to reflect on films such as Workers Leaving The Lumière Factory in Lyon (La Sortie de l'Usine Lumière à Lyon) (1895), A Trip to the Moon (1903) and The Great Train Robbery (1903).


Fiction/documentary (with Dr Deirdre Russell, Lecturer in Film Studies)

This session will investigate the similarities, differences and relationship between fiction and documentary film, and explore some examples of the key trend in contemporary cinema to combine these two ‘super-genres’ in inventive ways. Students will be encouraged to reflect on films such as American Splendor (2004), My Winnipeg (2008), Waltz With Bashir (2008) and The Arbor (2010).


Film, race and racism (with Dr Deirdre Russell, Lecturer in Film Studies)

This session will explore cinema’s representations of race and whether or in what ways it contributes to racism. Students will be encouraged to reflect on films such as The Searchers (1956), The Battle of Algiers (1966), Do The Right Thing (1989) and Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014).


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Geography

Geography

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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Health and Social Care

Health and Social Care

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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History

JFK History

THE MID TUDOR CRISIS IN WALES AND ENGLAND c.1529-1570

‘This realm of England is an empire’: political and religious change in Wales, 1532-1547

‘Elizabeth, the pretended Queen of England’: religion and politics under the Tudor queens


ROYALTY, REBELLION AND REPUBLIC c.1625-1660 

Pathways to conflict: causes of the civil war (1625-1642)

Debating the causes of the civil war: historical interpretations

Assessing the impact of civil war: people, politics and propaganda (1642-1660)


REFORM AND PROTEST IN WALES AND ENGLAND c.1783-1848

From mindless ‘mobs’ to rational ‘crowds’: making sense of popular protest, c. 1812-1831

Sewers, drains and workhouses: heroes and villains in an age of social reform


POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN WALES AND ENGLAND c.1900-1939

The economic, social and political impact of war, 1900-1918

Economic, political and cultural change, 1918-1939


RELIGIOUS REFORMATION IN EUROPE c.1500-1567

Luther’s reformation: what made it work?  (1500-31) 


The second generation: Radicals, Calvinists, and Counter-Reformers (1531-64)


FRANCE IN REVOLUTION c.1774-1815

France in Crisis: causes of the revolution and internal/external reactions (1774-1792)

Creating a New France: from Republic to Empire (1774-1815)


THE CRISIS OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC c.1840-1877

Slavery and territorial expansion, or “Was the War Inevitable?”

Could the conflict over slavery only be resolved by war? Not everybody thought so. Many Northerners were ready to appease Southern slave holders. Equally, many Southerners were reluctant to break away from the United States. Why then did so many people rush to war in 1861?

Why did the South lose the War?

Southerners went to war anticipating victory - and a swift victory at that. It never arrived. What advantages did the North have that allowed for the crushing of the South? And if the North had advantages, why did it take four years for them to come to the fore?


GERMANY: DEMOCRACY AND DICTATORSHIP 1918-45


Who voted for Hitler, and why?

The Weimar Republic and the Nazi Party This workshop presents recent research on key questions for the history of Weimar Germany: Why did the Nazi party’s support grow in the early 1930s?  What tactics did the Nazis use to attract support, and what problems in Weimar government and society could they exploit? Who, in the end, voted for the Nazi party, and why?


The Holocaust – how did ‘civilisation’ fail?

How could an ultra-racist murderous minority in the Nazi leadership bring about a policy of mass murder couched in bureaucratic language and a pseudo-scientific ideology? Investigating these themes, and the role of the Führer, Adolf Hitler, in the Third Reich casts some light on what went so horrifically wrong in a country of high culture, high modernity and supposedly ‘civilised’ European way of life in the context of racial war in the East. The talk also addresses the situation of the Jews from social exclusion to systematic mass murder.


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Information Communication Technology

Computing

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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Law

Moot Court Room

We are all equal, right?

In this interactive session learners will explore what equality is. There are many questions that need to be asked before one can go about ensuring that everyone is treated equally. Students will examine what being treated equally means, explore who should or deserves to be treated this way and discover ways in which equality can be achieved.


Ooh Ahh Cantona!

This theme will focus on the growth of sports related torts and will examine the liability for injuries caused by other sports participants.  The session will take the form of an interactive case study.  This theme links to themes of negligence taught in Tort and Transactional Learning in year one and Sports Law in years 2 and 3.


Knowing your legal and human rights: An interactive moot court debate

Examine a real-life case study, while considering the principles of either the Human Rights or Consumer Rights Act. Problem-solving in teams within a competitive environment.


Making intellectual property more tangible

Students will develop tools to identify intellectual property and the processes required to maximise it, whilst guarding against misappropriation.


Corporate killing

This session explores the liability of companies for the deaths of workers or members of the public. The challenges of prosecuting an ‘entity’ rather than an individual are placed under the spotlight. Using recent case law, students will confront the difficulties that face prosecutors and debate the workability of the law in this area.


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Mathematics

Cards

Codes, Gyroscopes and Magic Tricks 

This talk looks at some things we do every day: communicate on mobile phones, ride bicycles, etc. and shows how we can understand and improve them using maths. It will (hopefully!) convince you that maths can be fun, and is not just about exams, and something you might like to find out more about. It will also give an overview of some of the sorts of maths you might encounter at university e.g. did you know that there are statements in maths that may be true but you cannot prove them?


'Cheat' before the game

Mathematics is used in games in many different ways - from getting a computer to choose a move in chess, to working out whether a missile hits a target in a war game, to card counting in blackjack. This session looks at how a mathematical analysis of the costs of cards in collectable turn-based card games can help players to build the most cost-effective decks and improve their chances of winning. It also highlights how this sort of thinking is important in solving many commercial problems.


Operational Research - Maths in the Real World

Solving problems and making decisions in areas from manufacturing, government, healthcare and sport, Operational Research is "the Science of Better". Learn how mathematics can help us answer questions such as how big should the next football stadium be? How many beds do we need in a new hospital?


Mathematically Modelling the Climate

Mathematical modelling is all about assumptions and approximations. We start with simple models, then increase the complexity until we are accurately modelling our system. How does this work with climate modelling? How do our mathematical models forecast the weather and predict the climate? How do we know we can trust the results of our model?


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Media

Media

Careers in Journalism 

This session will outline the careers available to students after completing a journalism degree, and how to get there!


Things you didn’t know about Journalism

This session will offer students an insight into topics concerned with journalism that they might not have thought about, such as law, social media, editing and desktop publishing. 


Film Studies


Students will be introduced to cinema programming and education, and will undertake a brief activity about festival programming.


Film

Students will learn more about studying Film at University, the difference between documentary and fiction film-making, and gain an insight into the industry and possible career paths. Students will also be shown examples of work by current students, and be invited to discuss in more detail. 



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Music

Music

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


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Physical Education

Sport

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


>> Visit Immersive Learning

Psychology

Psychology

These sessions don't yet come out to you, but we have some fantastic Taster Days, Conferences and CPD sessions on-campus!


>> Visit Immersive Learning

Public Services & Politics

Public Services and Politics

Devolution in Wales (Unit 1: government, policies and the public service)

In Scotland’s recent referendum, 16 and 17 year-olds played a significant role, with many voting YES to independence. Debate the impact that elections and the electoral system have,  the effect of further devolution in Wales and whether it matters how many levels of government there are.


Citizenship, diversity and public services (Unit 3)

Debate whether fairness means that we should all be treated in the same way, or whether it’s possible to treat people differently and still be fair. Explore examples of fairness in policing, education, health and welfare reform to think about the impact of policies on different groups.


Extended research in public services (Unit 7)

Explore examples of high-quality research and how it affects the delivery of services. Develop the skills needed to design and independently carry out an in-depth research project related to public services.


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Sociology

Sociology

Certain Uncertainty in a global world

This keynote is a fantastic catalyst for launching the WBQ Global Citizenship Challenge in your school or college, PSHE sessions or school wide assemblies. This keynote illustrates the impact of modern phenomena, such as SARS, tsunamis and conflicts and how they become global events in minutes, rather than months. Underpinned by the radical shift in the speed of communication, the scale and complexity of these events, it outlines how these old problems need new solutions in a global community.


The Design of Everyday Society

This workshop uses three examples of everyday life to show how we can ‘make familiar things strange’ through sociological analysis. Looking at traffic lights, self-checkouts, and shopping centre escalators, we can ask questions about the design and functions of our shared society. This allows us to examine the relations of power that led to the everyday world looking and operating the way that it does, and to consider the ways that ‘material society’ shapes and influences our lives in ways we often don’t notice. This workshop links to the content of WJEC GCE AS/A Level Sociology Unit 1 and Unit 3.


Society and the Anthropocene

In our current era of the Anthropocene, human activities are shaping the climate and geology of the planet. These activities of industrial production and intensive consumerism occur within national societies and across the many and far reaching processes of globalization. We will examine how this new reality calls for important developments in our understandings of structure and agency, as well as our responsibilities as citizens of a world-wide society and participants in global culture. This workshop connects to themes in WJEC GCE AS/A Level Sociology Unit 3 and Unit 4.


Robots and the Ethics of Invention

We are in the process of developing a wide range of robotics for applications throughout industry and for personal use, including ‘general purpose robots’ that would move and interact in a wide variety of ways throughout public spaces. How will society need to adjust to this introduction of a new category of social actors? What are the ethical and legal implications? And what do the possibilities of automation reveal to us about the constructions of social conduct we already experience? This workshop will connect with many themes spanning WJEC GCE AS/A Level Sociology Unit 2, Unit 3, and Unit 4.


Societies of the Future: Imagination and Power

To understand the society of the future we need to grasp the difference between ‘tomorrows today’ and ‘today’s tomorrow’. ‘Tomorrows today’ includes all our different imaginations about what the future could or should be, and these can be found in numerous places from social policies to science fiction narratives. ‘Today’s tomorrow’ are the elements of the future that are defined by what we are doing and making right now, the many ways we are shaping communities, opportunities, and environments. This workshop explores how these influential themes intertwine, shaped by forms of politics and power, while shaping unfolding social inequalities and divisions. The workshop connects with many themes in the curriculum, although it is especially relevant to WJEC GCE AS/A Level Sociology Unit 4.


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Travel and Tourism

Celtic Manor apprenctices

How to deal with customer complaints

This session deals with the sensitivities of handling customer complaints effectively. Students will learn about a number of strategies with the help of real examples and case studies.

References: BTEC L3 Travel and Tourism, Unit 3: Managing the Customer Experience, Learning Aim C


Sustainability in Travel and Tourism

Why should the travel industry concern itself with social issues? This session will explore how businesses could be responsible, and yet profitable.

References: BTEC L3 Travel and Tourism, Unit 5: Rearching current issues in travel and tourism, Learning Aim A


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Youth and Community Work

Course Image BA Hons Youth and Community Work (Youth Justice)

Working within youth offending teams*

A scenario based session involving role play, students are challenged to adopt a role in the Youth Offending Team tasked with engaging a group of NEET young people, addressing issues as they arise and working collaboratively between other services and agencies.


School-based youth work

A scenario based session involving role play, students are challenged to manage teenage referrals for disruptive behaviour and disengagement with the curriculum. Students develop empathy for teachers and advisers whilst working collectively to prepare successful interventions.


Community-based youth work

A scenario based session involving role play, students must develop an approach to engage young people (aged 16 to 19) who have annoyed local residents, and prepare a range of possible resolutions.


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