Five minutes with Billy Hardy

Billy_Hardy, The Family Institute

A former Community Psychiatric Nurse, Billy Hardy trained at the Family Institute in the late 80s/early 90s. After a management position in the NHS, and a post as a lecturer in Community Psychiatric nursing at Swansea University, Billy moved to The Family Institute in 1998 as a Family Therapist and trainer. He teaches on a range of undergraduate courses, including BSc Systemic Counselling and MSc Systemic Psychotherapy.


Tell us about your students 

We have a wide range of students - some postgraduates, post doctoral, and many from different professional backgrounds such as Nursing, Social Work, Clinical and Educational Psychology, Teachers, ex-Lawyers, Psychiatrists and more. We’ve even had an actor or two.


Why should people study counselling/psychotherapy here? 

The Family Institute has a long history of training Family Psychotherapists. We have a unique training philosophy and we hope our students benefit from this both personally and professionally. 

Our training attends to the wholeness of learning and developing therapeutic knowledge and skills. There is strong link with clinical practice and as the teaching staff are also all clinicians, our students get a rich learning experience with us. It’s a collaborative process of learning and development over a four-year period. It is both intimate, focused, robust and above all, we help to create ethically-attuned practitioners who are highly skilled professionals upon qualification .

We also privilege our on-going relationships with those who train with us, and keep our Alumni process going beyond training and learning.


What are you most often asked by prospective students? 

  • Is this course accredited? Yes it’s a UK Council for Psychotherapy accredited  course.
  • How much does it cost?  These are like seasonal answers as fees usually increase year by year. In total, expect to pay over the fours of training, so about £15,000.
  • How often do I need to attend? Every two weeks for a two-day block during the academic year for two years.