BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing

This dynamic English and Creative Writing degree combines study of creative and professional writing with a range of complementary modules that explore English language and literature.  The degree incorporates training and experience of the uses of English in the community and the workplace: with opportunities such as conducting writing for wellbeing workshops, training in media,  and production skills, gaining teaching experience,  collaborating with creative industries and publishers.    

From Shakespeare to modern crime and fantasy literature, our English degree enhances transferable key skills such as expression, critical thinking and writing. Students don’t just learn write fiction, they also practise blogging, digital media, copywriting and travel-journals, learning how to create effective content that can be published and sold.   

Alongside developing your skills in writing fiction, poetry, scriptwriting and non-fiction, you’ll gain specialist skills in analysis and close reading. The development of these skills means you’ll be ready for the workplace when you graduate. There are also many opportunities to showcase your written work and to work on placements and projects to support your future career. 

UCAS Code Study Mode
2024
Duration Start Date Campus Campus Code
41W2 Full-time 3 Years September Treforest A

Year 1 

  • Language Awareness
  • Texts and Tools
  • Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature
  • Being Human: Voices and Silence
  • Language and the Media
  • Approaching Poetry

 

 

Year 2

  • English in the workplace
  • Language, Power and Ideology
  • The Long Nineteenth Century
  • Utopia/Dystopia
  • Story: Fiction and Non-Fiction
  • Gothic Literature: Dark Desires

 

 

Year 3

  • Uses of English: Language in Creative and Professional Contexts
  • Modernism and After
  • Dissertation
  • Writing for Publication
  • Postcolonial Literature
  • Myth, Narrative and Film

Teaching

There is a thriving English research culture at the University, and many staff publications have been recognised as internationally excellent or world leading. You’ll be taught by academics who are world leaders in their fields of study and by prize-winning poets and fiction writers. You’ll learn through a variety of stimulating activities including lectures, seminar discussions, workshops and creative exercises.

The English and Creative Writing team also has long established links with Literature Wales, the national literature and promotion agency for writers in Wales. With their help we have been proud to welcome several major visiting writers, including Simon Armitage, Benjamin Zephaniah, Gillian Clarke, Les Murray, Dannie Abse, Andrew Motion, Wendy Cope, and the first National Poet of Wales, Gwyneth Lewis.

Assessment

Assessment is through coursework and examination. The range of assessment includes group oral presentations, reading journals, essays and portfolios of original writing accompanied by commentaries that reflect on the writing process.

Placements

At USW we want you be a well-rounded graduate with lots to offer. So throughout your studies you’ll gain transferable skills that will help you succeed in any workplace – the ability to analyse information from different sources, construct reasoned arguments and communicate them effectively.

You can choose a work placement as an important part of your course. Designed to enhance your employability, this is a great way to make your CV stand out. There’s a wide range of things you could do. Students have worked at the Riverfront Theatre and Arts Centre, Wales Arts Review, Literature Wales, Seren Press, Buzz Magazine, The Big Issue, Able Radio, schools and libraries. Some students have worked on scripts in community film projects, for example, and even with the National Theatre.

Featured Lecturer:
Dr David Towsey

Dr David Towsey

Dr David Towsey is a novelist and short-story writer, who specialises in genre fiction. He is particularly interested in crossover texts that complicate genre boundaries. His Walkin' Trilogy of novels blends numerous tropes from zombie horror, post-apocalyptic science fiction, and the western. He also co-writes fantasy-crime under the pseudonym D.K. Fields, whose Tales of Fenest trilogy considers the impact of storytelling in the democratic process. Find more about Dr Towsey's work on his blog and the English Research website.

Lecturers

Dr Ayo Amuda's primary research interest is on language use in society, particularly, communication in multilingual communities. He is the author of several articles on the subject, including Socio-Historiography of Names in an Oral Culture (2012).

Dr Mike Chick's research interests include second language teacher education as well as the organisation of ESOL provision for vulnerable sections of society. He has recently completed a research project investigating the barriers to employment faced by participants on the Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.

Dr Nic Dunlop is a specialist in postcolonial writing, genre and contemporary literature. He has published widely and is currently completing a monograph on representations of education and postcolonialism in science fiction.

Professor Alice Entwistle specialises in poetry, usually contemporary, and often (though not always) by women. Much of her work examines the connections between text, form and place(s); she is also interested in creative-critical writing and cross-disciplinary collaborative practice in the arts and humanities.

Barrie Llewelyn teaches fiction, poetry and non-fiction with a special interest in writing for the media and the essay form. She is also interested in the often fluid line between fiction and non-fiction. Recent research interests have taken Barrie’s focus to the link between creativity and well-being. The Speak to Me project partners resettled refugees with local English speakers in a series of creative writing workshops.

Professor Kevin Mills teaches Nineteenth-Century Literature, English Renaissance Literature, and Myth and Narrative. He also leads the MPhil in Writing. His research interests include theory, literature and the Bible, and Victorian literature, as well as the relationship between critical and creative writing.

Dr David Towsey is a novelist and short-story writer, who specialises in genre fiction. He is particularly interested in crossover texts that complicate genre boundaries. His Walkin' Trilogy of novels blends numerous tropes from zombie horror, post-apocalyptic science fiction, and the western. He also co-writes fantasy-crime under the pseudonym D.K. Fields, whose Tales of Fenest trilogy considers the impact of storytelling in the democratic process.

Professor Diana Wallace works mainly on women’s writing. Her research interests include historical fiction, the Gothic, Modernism, and Welsh writing in English. She is co-editor of The International Journal of Welsh Writing in English and co-editor of UWP’s series Gender in Studies in Wales.

Dr Rhian Webb lectures in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Her primary research examines native English speakers’ knowledge about grammar, which informs her teaching. In 2020, she established a research collaboration with Cardiff based Peartree Languages, which develops strategies to teach and deliver online English lessons to international learners.

Find out more about our English research and latest publications.

We regularly revalidate courses for quality assurance and enhancement

At USW, we regularly review our courses in response to changing patterns of employment and skills demand to ensure we offer learning designed to reflect today’s student needs and tomorrow’s employer demands.

If during a review process course content is significantly changed, we’ll write to inform you and talk you through the changes for the coming year. But whatever the outcome, we aim to equip our students with the skillset and the mindset to succeed whatever tomorrow may bring. Your future, future-proofed.

Contextual offers

We may make you a lower offer based on a range of factors, including your background (where you live and the school or college that you attended for example), your experiences and individual circumstances (as a care leaver, for example). This is referred to as a contextual offer and we receive data from UCAS to support us in making these decisions. USW prides itself on its student experience and we support our students to achieve their goals and become a successful graduate. This approach helps us to support students who have the potential to succeed and who may have faced barriers that make it more difficult to access university. Here is a link to our Contextual Admissions Policy.  

Other qualifications and experience
 

We can also consider combinations of qualifications and other qualifications not listed here may also be acceptable. We can sometimes consider credits achieved at other universities and your work/life experience through an assessment of prior learning. This may be for year one entry, or advanced entry to year two or three of a course where this is possible.

To find out which qualifications have tariff points, please refer to the UCAS tariff calculator.

If you need more help or information or would like to speak to our friendly admissions team, please contact us here

Typical A-Level Offer

BCC to usually include English (this is equivalent to 104 UCAS tariff points). Applicants without A Level English will be considered on an individual basis.

Typical Welsh BACC Offer

Pass the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Diploma with Grade C/B in the Skills Challenge Certificate and BC - CC at A Level to usually include English (this is equivalent to 104 UCAS tariff points). Applicants without A Level English will be considered on an individual basis.

Typical BTEC Offer

BTEC Extended Diploma Distinction Merit Merit Applicants without A Level English will be considered on an individual basis.

Typical Access to HE Offer

Pass the Access to HE Diploma and obtain a minimum of 104 UCAS tariff points.

Additional Requirements

GCSEs: The University normally requires a minimum 5 GCSEs including Mathematics/Numeracy and English at Grade C or Grade 4 or above, or their equivalent, but consideration is given to individual circumstances. 

 

International Entry Requirements

We also welcome international applications with equivalent qualifications. Please visit the country specific pages on our international website for exact details.

English Requirements

In general, international applicants will need to have achieved an overall IELTS grade of 6.0 with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component.

However, if you have previously studied through the medium of English IELTS might not be required, but please visit the country specific page on our international website for exact details. If your country is not featured please contact us.

Full-time fees are per year. Part-time fees are per 20 credits. Once enrolled, the fee will remain at the same rate throughout the duration of your study on this course

 

August 2024 - July 2025 Fees


  • Full-time UK:  £9000

  • Full-time International:  £14950 

Student Perks

At the University of South Wales, you’re investing in so much more than a degree. We strive to provide our students with the best possible experience, no matter what you chose to study. Whether it’s access to top of the range mac books and PCs, state-of-the-art facilities packed with industry-leading equipment and software, masterclasses and events led by industry experts, or a wide range of clubs and societies to meet likeminded people, better tomorrows start with extra perks.

Each course also has their own unique student benefits to prepare you for the real word, and details of these can be found on our course pages. From global field trips, integrated work experience and free course-related resources, to funded initiatives, projects working with real employers, and opportunities for extra qualifications and accreditations - at USW your future, is future-proofed.

Click here to learn more about student perks at USW.

Additional Costs

As a student of USW, you’ll have access to lots of free resources to support your study and learning, such as textbooks, publications, online journals, laptops, and plenty of remote-access resources. Whilst in most cases these resources are more than sufficient in supporting you with completing your course, additional costs, both obligatory and optional, may be required or requested for the likes of travel, memberships, experience days, stationery, printing, or equipment.

Funding

Funding to help pay for (or cover) course tuition fees and living costs

Whilst you’re studying, you’ll have two main financial obligations – tuition fees and living costs. There’s lots of financial help available from the University of South Wales and external funding sources, that may provide loans (which have to be paid back) and grants, scholarships and bursaries (that don't).

To learn about course fees, funding options, and to see if you are eligible for financial support, visit our Fees and Funding pages.

UK students

Apply via UCAS if you are a UK residing applicant, applying for year one of a full-time undergraduate degree, Foundation Year, Foundation Degree or HND and you have not applied through UCAS before. If you are applying to study part-time, to top up your Foundation Degree or HND, or to transfer to USW from another institution, please apply directly

International and EU students

Apply directly to the University if you live outside the UK. 

Admissions statement

Graduates of our English and creative writing degree ave an enviable record of establishing careers in editing, publishing, teaching, writing, advertising, public relations, the civil service, local government, arts administration and broadcasting. Many students also progress to postgraduate study at the University. If you take modules in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) you’ll also gain the USW Graduate TESOL Certificate. You’ll be highly knowledgeable about how language works and have the skills to teach others how to communicate in English. Millions of people around the world are learning English, so there is a huge demand for qualified English language teachers – great news for people with a TESOL qualification.

Our Careers and Employability Service

As a USW English student, you will have access to advice from the Careers and Employability Service throughout your studies and after you graduate.

This includes: one-to-one appointments from faculty based Career Advisers, in person, over the phone or even on Skype and through email via the "Ask a Question" service. We also have extensive online resources for help with considering your career options and presenting yourself well to employers. Resources include psychometric tests, career assessments, a CV builder, interview simulator and application help. Our employer database has over 2,000 registered employers targeting USW students, you can receive weekly email alerts for jobs.

Our Careers service has dedicated teams: A central work experience team to help you find relevant placements; an employability development team which includes an employability programme called Grad Edge; and an Enterprise team focused on new business ideas and entrepreneurship.

Full-time